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Top Indonesia Hotels

The ebb and flow of troubles that have washed over the Indonesian archipelago for much of the last five years reached their apogee with the terrorist bombings in Bali in October 2002. In the wake of the financial crash of the late 1990s, government shenanigans in Jakarta and unrest in the remainder of the country, the attack was the last thing that Indonesia needed.
At the time of writing, international advisories still warned against non-essential travel to Indonesia, and the decision to go there remains very much a personal choice.

That this is a source of regret cannot be overstated, as the country's 13,00 0-plus islands, strung from Sumatra in the west to Irian Jaya in the east, make up one of the most fascinating parts of Southeast Asia. More than 1,000 years ago traders from as far away China were sailing to the spice islands of Indonesia, and the same commodity drew Europeans as early as the 16th century. Dutch colonialists subsequently gained a strong foothold in the country, and - after the Japanese occupation during World War II - Indonesia only finally achieved independence in 1949 after several years of armed struggle.

The decades that followed were marked by a gradual prosperity, interspersed with some domestic upheavals, and tourism only started to take off in the late 1960s, with Bali leading the way, as it has done ever since. First port of call for many visitors is the capital, Jakarta, a maelstrom of a metropolis which acts as a magnet for Indonesians from all over the country who have come to look for work. Bandung, a lovely art deco city which the Dutch planned as an alternative capital, sits in the hills to the east, while further across Java are stunning man-made wonders like the 1,000-year-old Buddhist temple of Borobudur and natural marvels like the dormant volcanic Mount Bromo.

The Hindu enclave of Bali, most tellingly described as "The Morning of the World", remains perhaps the most picturesque and intriguing of all the Indonesian islands, while further east Lombok and Flores are less developed but still hold many attractions for holidaymakers. Komodo is famed for its giant lizards, cunningly marketed as "dragons", while divers tend to flock to Sulawesi, and in particular to Manado, where Bunaken Island is ranked as one of the top underwater sites in the world.

More difficult to get to, the Bandas also have some superb coral reefs as well as a number of statuesque colonial forts. Sumatra, whose oil, rubber, pepper and coffee contribute largely to the Indonesian economy, has one of the country's most diverse ethnic populations. Irian Jaya remains very much the "wild east", however its trekking opportunities through the little travelled hinterland cannot be matched.

With a wealth of culture, natural beauty and marine sporting facilities, Indonesia has all the potential to become one of the region's top tourist destinations. Families travelling here will find their children are greeted with special warmth, providing an instant entre to the local community. The phrase "paradise resort" has been used so frequently it has almost lost its currency, but it really does apply to some of Indonesia's top-flight accommodation. Aman is the name that most obviously springs to mind, with three properties in Bali and two elsewhere, and the country's major destinations all host some very acceptable 5-stars.

Not that you always need to shell out top dollar, as inexpensive labour leads to high staffing levels and many of the intermediate hotels can be guaranteed to provide extremely comfortable stays. Perhaps the best value of all, Indonesia's guesthouses, or losmen, are often family run and very hospitable. Straddling the equator, Indonesia has two main seasons - wet between October and April, and dry for the rest of the year, with slight geographical variations. The wet season is by no means unbearable, as storms tend to come in sudden bursts and once they have subsided it will be dry for the rest of the day.

The Christmas holiday season traditionally attracts a horde of visitors from Australia and the rest of the world. Still, the political climate is what will really be affecting visitor's plans and it is only to be hoped for that it will stablise soon.


source: http://www.asiahotels.com/indonesia

Written by : Rinda Marestiani - Blogger

Assalamualaikum im Rinda. of Rinda Marestiani. Asli Blitar Jawa timur,,, '94 Generation. Memiliki Ibu yang luar biasa bernama Sudarwati dan Bapak super hebat bernama Suroso. Nah pada tanggal 15 Agustus 2014, tepatnya jika menurut kalender islam pas bulan syawal, di peristri sama lelaki hebat keturunan Madiun Sumbawa yang bernama Candra Aditya. Kesibukan saat ini full time be a lovely wife, learn blog, and 24 jam nemeni suami kerja. Thanks

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